PATHEOS: SERIES ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING

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Prompted by an editor who has worked at NGOs for years fighting human trafficking, this series started with an interview with an Evangelical megapastor, and then an academic who raises questions about whether Evangelicals are monopolizing American anti-trafficking efforts. A lively debate proceeded from there, which took us from Nepal to South Africa and back to New York City.

Samuel Rodriguez on a Global Evangelical Movement to End Human Trafficking

Are Evangelicals Monopolizing, Misleading US Anti-Trafficking Efforts?

Tim Dalrymple and John Mark Reynolds, Philosophical Fragments: Surprise! Evangelical Efforts Against Sex-Trafficking are “Colonialist”!

Derek Rishmawy, Christ and Pop Culture: Sex-Trafficking, Evangelical “Colonialism”, and the Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

Derek Rishmawy (for Philosophical Fragments)Sex-Trafficking, Evangelical “Colonialism”, and the Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

Laura Agustín, The Naked Anthropologist: Chink in the Evangelical wall: Sex trafficking, colonialism and Christian ethics

Morgan Guyton, Mercy not Sacrifice: Sex-trafficking, colonialism, and miscommunication

Are American Anti-human Trafficking Efforts on Shaky Moral Ground?

How Buddhist Nuns Fight Human Trafficking in Nepal

Proselytizing While Fighting Trafficking: Human Rights Violation?

Republication of How Buddhist Nuns Fight Human Trafficking in Nepal by tricycle, a Buddhist journal based in New York City

A Code of Conduct for Anti-Trafficking Efforts

Humanitarian Help and Joining a Church: Quid Pro Quo?

RADIO FRANCE INTERNATIONALE: INSIDE PARIS’ 3-STAR RESTAURANTS

Logo: Michelin

A 2009 piece of long-form (20 min.) radio journalism, this feature for Rendezvous, a program on French culture, explores the Michelin Guide, the pioneering restaurant review publication. It’s influential — and some say, influenced.

The draft script is pasted below. You’ll notice some differences between my version and the one that aired. The editor took out some of the best jokes. :l

Click the link to hear the piece: The Myths and Mysteries of the Michelin Stars

RENDEZ-VOUS APRIL 16, 2009

MICHELIN GUIDE 10TH EDITION

ERIK CAMPANO

 

NARRATION IN BOLD IS RECORDED IN STUDIO

CHANGES TO FIRST DRAFT ARE UNDERLINED

MIXING NOTES

– ROMAN NUMERAL.ARABIC NUMERAL INDICATES AUDIO TITLES

– IF YOU NEED TO GO BACK TO THE SOUND IN THE ORIGINAL AUDIO, THE ROMAN NUMERAL INDICATES THE AUDIO FILE (PRECEDED BY CM) AND THE ARABIC NUMERAL INDICATES THE APPROXIMATE MARKER INSIDE THAT FILE.

– X“ DENOTES RAW AUDIO LENGTH WITHOUT INTERIOR CUTS

– … NOTATES A SUBSTANTIAL INTERIOR CUT IN THE RAW ACTUALITY

(XVI MUSIC UP A FEW SECONDS THEN FADE TO BED)

WHEN ANCIENT CAPTAINS WERE NAVIGATING THE OCEANS, THEY USED THE STARS AS THEIR GUIDE. AND WHEN MODERN FRENCH GOURMETS NAVIGATE THE COUNTRY LOOKING FOR THE BEST FOOD, THEY ALSO USE STARS – MICHELIN STARS. THAT IS, THE STARS THATMICHELIN INCLUDES IN ITS TRAVEL GUIDE BOOKS, PROBABLY THE MOST INFLUENTIAL RESTAURANT REVIEW SYSTEM IN THE WORLD.

(MUSIC UP FOR A FEW SECONDS AND DOWN TO BED)

I’M ERIK CAMPANO. THIS WEEK ON RENDEZ-VOUS: THE MICHELINGUIDE IS CELEBRATING ITS 100TH ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’LL USE THAT OCCASION TO LOOK AT THE IDIOSYNCRATIC CULTURE SURROUNDING THE MICHELIN STAR. THE COMPANY HAS A SECRETIVE PROCESS OF AWARDING THEM; CHEFS UNDERGO TURMOIL TO GET AND KEEP THEM; AND OUTSIDERS TELL STORIES OF RESTAURANT REVIEWERS GONE CORRUPT.

Continue reading “RADIO FRANCE INTERNATIONALE: INSIDE PARIS’ 3-STAR RESTAURANTS” »

PATHEOS: A CALVINIST PASTOR EXTOLS LIBERTARIAN ECONOMICS

economicsforeverybodybookjacket

It was suggested to me that I interview popular preacher R.J. Sproul, Jr., about his new DVD series, Economics for Everybody. The interview ultimately raised not just questions about goods and services, but about how clerics use their discipline to try to promote economic ideologies.

How is Religion Used to Justify an Economic Ideology?

PATHEOS: SERIES ON THE VALIDITY OF THE PRIESTHOOD AND PAPACY

anglican-ordination

This conversation began when I interviewed Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Garry Wills about his new book, Why Priests?: A Failed Tradition. The interview occurred just prior to the Papal Conclave following the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. The interview prompted reaction from the Roman Catholic left and right as well as American Anglicans, all of whom gave their thoughts about the priesthood from a theological, historical, and anthropological perspective.

Garry Wills on Priests, Popes, Secrecy, and the Internet

Kurt Wiesner, The Episcopal Café: More on priests with Gary Wills

The Secrets of the Conclave… and the Church

“Jesus did not don gold cloaks”: the Future of the Papacy

Pope Francis’ Jesuit origins prompted a follow-up interview with J. Patrick Hornbeck, II, a theology professor at the Jesuit Fordham University in the Bronx:

What Do The Jesuits REALLY Think About Pope Francis?